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Medical cannabis in the UK

Doctors will be able to prescribe medicine derived from marijuana 'by the autumn'

Doctors will be able to prescribe medicine derive from marijuana ‘by the autumn’ ( AP/Jeff Chiu )

Doctors will be allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis within months after home secretary Sajid Javid was advise by the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs that it has therapeutic benefits.

It follows several high-profile campaigns which capture widespread media attention and evoke deep public sympathy.

Campaigners had question how severely epileptic children could be prevent from accessing medicines that significantly improved their condition while the UK remained the world’s largest exporter of medicinal cannabis.

The UK’s move to legalize medicinal cannabis products will bring the country’s policy closer to that in countries. such as Canada, Holland, Portugal and the majority of US states.

Furthermore  medical cannabis was outlaw almost five decades ago in 1971 amid fears that the substance served as a gateway to more dangerous drugs, with the US spearheading a return to the so-called ‘reefer madness’ era.

Now, however, as emerging clinical data and volumes of anecdotal evidence amasses, suggesting cannabis can help patients living with epilepsy. MS, cancer and other serious conditions, modern medicine in the UK could be prime for serious change.

1How do experts think it could help patients?

Research on cannabis

Medical cannabis in the UK has been limite since it was classify as a schedule 1 drug with no recognise therapeutic benefits until Thursday, meaning that Home Office licenses were required to examine the drug.

Furthermore there is, however, surprising evidence of cannabis’ efficacy, given the drug has been illegal in most countries for many years. According to Professor Mike Barnes, an expert in medicinal cannabis and the clinician who secure Alfie Dingley’s emergency license earlier.

In a recent article for the British Medical Journal. So He explain how cannabis could be useful for the treatment of chronic pain, spasticity, nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy. The recent case of Alfie Dingley and other children, whose epilepsy responded to  cannabis oils containing CBD and THC. Shows that the matter is complex and that some children seem to respond maximally to a combination of low THC.

Medical cannabis in the UK

“A recent Cochrane systematic review of 23 randomize control trials confirm the anti-emetic properties of “cannabinoids”. Patients were five times more likely to report complete absence of vomiting against placebo.

Because “Several reviews have assessed the efficacy of various cannabinoid preparations for the management of chronic pain. Furthermore One review found eight studies and concluded there was “moderate quality. Evidence of efficacy against placebo to support the use of cannabinoids,” he added.

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